Artsy
Artsy
+
+
+
screenyourworry:

Emma Über
screenyourworry:

Emma Über
+
jnoriega:

Painting by Marc Laroche on Flickr.
+
+
matthewreid:

illiustration by Matthew Reid
+
matthewreid:

“fear of flying” acrylic on found wood - Matthew Reid
+
jenmann:

a 360 of my studio today
jenmann:

a 360 of my studio today
jenmann:

a 360 of my studio today
jenmann:

a 360 of my studio today
jenmann:

a 360 of my studio today
+
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Adam Rushton. Enriched with Marrow Bone Jelly.
+
farewell-kingdom:

Armada, Jacob Hashimoto
farewell-kingdom:

Armada, Jacob Hashimoto
farewell-kingdom:

Armada, Jacob Hashimoto
farewell-kingdom:

Armada, Jacob Hashimoto
+
devidsketchbook:

Metamorphosis #1 by DAN BEARD
2009 Oil and lacquer on photograph 75 x 170cm
devidsketchbook:

Metamorphosis #1 by DAN BEARD
2009 Oil and lacquer on photograph 75 x 170cm
+
artchipel:

Kozue Oshima (b.1978, Japan) - 「波樹」plume. 130×97cm (2008)
[more Kozue Oshima | artist found at darksilenceinsuburbia]
+
farewell-kingdom:

Superabundant Atmosphere, Jacob Hashimoto
farewell-kingdom:

Superabundant Atmosphere, Jacob Hashimoto
farewell-kingdom:

Superabundant Atmosphere, Jacob Hashimoto
farewell-kingdom:

Superabundant Atmosphere, Jacob Hashimoto
+
arpeggia:

Painting With Sound
Like a 3-D take on Jackson Pollock, the latest work by the artist Martin Klimas begins with splatters of paint in fuchsia, teal and lime green, positioned on a scrim over the diaphragm of a speaker. Then the volume is turned up. For each image, Klimas selects music — typically something dynamic and percussive — and the vibration of the speaker sends the paint aloft in patterns that reveal themselves through the lens of his Hasselblad. For this series, Klimas spent six months and about 1,000 shots to produce the final images. The resulting images are Klimas’s attempt to answer the question “What does music look like?” (via nytimes)
arpeggia:

Painting With Sound
Like a 3-D take on Jackson Pollock, the latest work by the artist Martin Klimas begins with splatters of paint in fuchsia, teal and lime green, positioned on a scrim over the diaphragm of a speaker. Then the volume is turned up. For each image, Klimas selects music — typically something dynamic and percussive — and the vibration of the speaker sends the paint aloft in patterns that reveal themselves through the lens of his Hasselblad. For this series, Klimas spent six months and about 1,000 shots to produce the final images. The resulting images are Klimas’s attempt to answer the question “What does music look like?” (via nytimes)
arpeggia:

Painting With Sound
Like a 3-D take on Jackson Pollock, the latest work by the artist Martin Klimas begins with splatters of paint in fuchsia, teal and lime green, positioned on a scrim over the diaphragm of a speaker. Then the volume is turned up. For each image, Klimas selects music — typically something dynamic and percussive — and the vibration of the speaker sends the paint aloft in patterns that reveal themselves through the lens of his Hasselblad. For this series, Klimas spent six months and about 1,000 shots to produce the final images. The resulting images are Klimas’s attempt to answer the question “What does music look like?” (via nytimes)
arpeggia:

Painting With Sound
Like a 3-D take on Jackson Pollock, the latest work by the artist Martin Klimas begins with splatters of paint in fuchsia, teal and lime green, positioned on a scrim over the diaphragm of a speaker. Then the volume is turned up. For each image, Klimas selects music — typically something dynamic and percussive — and the vibration of the speaker sends the paint aloft in patterns that reveal themselves through the lens of his Hasselblad. For this series, Klimas spent six months and about 1,000 shots to produce the final images. The resulting images are Klimas’s attempt to answer the question “What does music look like?” (via nytimes)
arpeggia:

Painting With Sound
Like a 3-D take on Jackson Pollock, the latest work by the artist Martin Klimas begins with splatters of paint in fuchsia, teal and lime green, positioned on a scrim over the diaphragm of a speaker. Then the volume is turned up. For each image, Klimas selects music — typically something dynamic and percussive — and the vibration of the speaker sends the paint aloft in patterns that reveal themselves through the lens of his Hasselblad. For this series, Klimas spent six months and about 1,000 shots to produce the final images. The resulting images are Klimas’s attempt to answer the question “What does music look like?” (via nytimes)
+
installationarts:

Daniel Buren
Excentrique(s)
2012
Site specific installation for MONUMENTA 2012, Grand Palais, Paris
(Opens the 10th Mai 2012)
(Hot Art News!!!! Exclusive on InstallationArts)
installationarts:

Daniel Buren
Excentrique(s)
2012
Site specific installation for MONUMENTA 2012, Grand Palais, Paris
(Opens the 10th Mai 2012)
(Hot Art News!!!! Exclusive on InstallationArts)